Tyrtylius' records

Half-halfling, half-elf wizard of the geomancer variety.

Faithfull scribe of the Noldor Calastir, Dark Lord of the Phallic Symbols. Currently living in his tower, trying to manage his household and estate while he searches for a cure for old age for his somnostatic human wife, the warpriestess Zena.

Science

alchemy, anatomy, astronomy, geography, mathematics, herbology, maps, mycology, language, script, technology,

History

history, History of Europe, History of Africa, history of America

Mythology

mythology, mesopotamian mythology, egyptian mythology, greek mythology, celtic mythology, norse mythology, japanese mythology, west-african mythology, gods, mythical creature,

Magic, folklore and ritual

magic, shamanism, curses, runes, tarot,folklore,magical plant, wizards workshop

Arts and crafts

theater, manuscript, illumination, sculpture, jewelry

syldoran:

medicalschool:

A child’s skull prior to loosing it’s baby teeth

children are terrifying little hellbeasts and I want you all to know this from a medical standpoint

(via krakensdottir)

nihtegale:

"Alexander being lowered into the sea in a cask, with the queen and her lover attempting to drown him by cutting the chains that support the diving bell. Alexander is saved by the knowledge that if he kills the cat that accompanies him, the sea which cannot tolerate blood, will throw the bell."

nihtegale:

Diver with an air reservoir.

Diving gear, page 92v from ‘Kriegsbuch’ (UER MS.B 26) by Ludwig von Eyb zum Hartenstein, 1500.

Source (and many more pictures!): http://digital.bib-bvb.de/view/bvbmets/viewer.0.5.jsp?folder_id=0&dvs=1409063309082~455&pid=4555786&locale=de&usePid1=true&usePid2=true

discardingimages:

medieval diving suit 

Konrad Kyeser, Bellifortis, Bavaria 1459.

København, Det Kongelige Bibliotek, Thott 290 2º, fol. 44r

discardingimages:

hunt of the unicorn 

'Ormesby Psalter', England ca. 1300.

Bodleian Library, MS. Douce 366, fol. 55v

eadfrith:

Leave My Unicorn Alone !!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Folio 8r from the Taymouth Hours.

Yates Thomspon MS 13

Images from the British Library Manuscript website.

http://www.bl.uk/manuscripts/FullDisplay.aspx?ref=Yates_Thompson_MS_13

nihtegale:

A knight spears a unicorn, who lies with its head in the lap of a virgin c.1225-1250

(via medieval)

massarrah:

Bilingual Seal of a Hittite King

In the center of this silver seal, an inscription in hieroglyphs (i.e., logograms) bears the name of Tarkummuwa, King of Mera, and the inscription is repeated in Hittite cuneiform along the rim. Discovered at the Turkish site of Smyrna, this bilingual seal provided one of the first clues to deciphering the hieroglyphic script native to ancient Anatolia. The language encoded in these hieroglyphs is, in fact, not Hittite, but Luwian. Both were Indo-European languages in use in ancient Anatolia during the second and first millennia BCE. (Source 1, 2)

Hittite, 1400 BCE.

The Walters Art Museum. Photo courtesy of CDLI.

ancientart:

Cyrus Cylinder, from Babylon, southern Iraq. Babylonian, about 539-530 BC.

A declaration of good kingship.

This clay cylinder is inscribed in Babylonian cuneiform with an account by Cyrus, king of Persia (559-530 BC) of his conquest of Babylon in 539 BC and capture of Nabonidus, the last Babylonian king.

Cyrus claims to have achieved this with the aid of Marduk, the god of Babylon. He then describes measures of relief he brought to the inhabitants of the city, and tells how he returned a number of images of gods, which Nabonidus had collected in Babylon, to their proper temples throughout Mesopotamia and western Iran. At the same time he arranged for the restoration of these temples, and organized the return to their homelands of a number of people who had been held in Babylonia by the Babylonian kings. Although the Jews are not mentioned in this document, their return to Palestine following their deportation by Nebuchadnezzar II, was part of this policy.

This cylinder has sometimes been described as the ‘first charter of human rights’, but it in fact reflects a long tradition in Mesopotamia where, from as early as the third millennium BC, kings began their reigns with declarations of reforms. (x)

Courtesy & currently located at the British Museum, London. Photo taken by Prioryman.

ancientart:

Foundation plaques B (photo 1) and A (photo 2), dating to the early 4th century BCE. Both these plaques of hammered gold have been inscribed in Old Persian, and are from Iran during the Achaemenid period.

Artefacts courtesy of the Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA. Photos taken by Daderot via the Wiki Commons.

statue-porn:

|| Diana of Versailles, Roman copy of a Greek original by Leochares, original statue c. 325 BCE.
Currenly located in The Louvre, Paris.

(via aorticinkwell)

HEKATE (or Hecate) was the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea.

Hekate was usually depicted in Greek vase painting as a woman holding twin torches. Sometimes she was dressed in a knee-length maiden’s skirt and hunting boots, much like Artemis. In statuary Hekate was often depicted in triple form as a goddess of crossroads.

Hekate was identified with a number of other goddesses, including Artemis and Selene (Moon), the Arkadian Despoine, the sea-goddess Krataeis, the goddess of the Taurian Khersonese (of Skythia), the Kolkhian Perseis, and Argive Iphigeneia, the Thracian goddesses Bendis and Kotys, Euboian Maira (the dog-star), Eleusinian Daeira and the Boiotian Nymphe Herkyna.

source: www.theoi.com

Diana and Hecate, etching by Václav Hollar (1607-1677)

source

lonelyspelltoconjureyou:

Hekate, a mysterious divinity, who, according to the most common tradition, was a daughter of Persaeus or Perses and Asteria, whence she is called Perseis. She is described as of terrible appearance, either with three bodies or three heads, the one of a horse, the second of a dog, and the third of a lion. In works of art she was some-times represented as a single being, but sometimes also as a three-headed monster.

According to the most genuine traditions, she appears to have been an ancient Thracian divinity, and a Titan, who, from the time of the Titans, ruled in heaven, on the earth, and in the sea, who bestowed on mortals wealth, victory, wisdom, good luck to sailors and hunters, and prosperity to youth and to the flocks of cattle; but all these blessings might at the same time be withheld by her, if mortals did not deserve them. She was the only one among the Titans who retained this power under the rule of Zeus, and she was honoured by all the immortal gods.

She accompanied Demeter in the search after Persephone; and when the latter was found, Hecate remained with her as her attendant and companion. She thus becomes a deity of the lower world; but this notion does not occur till the time of the Greek tragedians, though it is generally current among the later writers. She is described in this capacity as a mighty and formidable divinity, ruling over the souls of the departed ; she is the goddess of purifications and expiations, and is accompanied by Stygian dogs.

There is a very important feature which arose out of the notion of her being an infernal divinity, namely, she was regarded as a spectral being, who at night sent from the lower world all kinds of demons and terrible phantoms, who taught sorcery and witchcraft, who dwelt at places where two roads crossed each other, on tombs, and near the blood of murdered persons. She herself too wanders about with the souls of the dead, and her approach is announced by the whining and howling of dogs.

source: www.theoi.com

image: Olympus Tarot

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